Media Coverage

Never too young for a business plan

By Heather Bellow

Published April 14, 2017 in The Berkshire Eagle

SHEFFIELD — Megan Smith had an idea for dealing with the endless task of battling overgrown brush and invasive species in Berkshire County's wild yards and fields: Goat-scaping.

"Goats love to eat that stuff," said Smith, 15, a Mount Everett Regional High School freshman. "They would eat it and it would be gone."

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Never too young for a business plan

By Heather Bellow

Published April 14, 2017 in The Berkshire Eagle

SHEFFIELD — Megan Smith had an idea for dealing with the endless task of battling overgrown brush and invasive species in Berkshire County's wild yards and fields: Goat-scaping.

"Goats love to eat that stuff," said Smith, 15, a Mount Everett Regional High School freshman. "They would eat it and it would be gone."

Odd Lots: What the Berkshires Learned by Launching its Own Currency

From Bloomberg: Every week, hosts Joe Weisenthal and Tracy Alloway take you on a not-so-random walk through hot topics in markets, finance and economics.


"Buy local" is a mantra that has appeal across the political spectrum. Small communities have preached this gospel for a long time. The current U.S. president advocates a version on a national scale. So how do you put it into practice?

 One experiment has been taking place in the Berkshires -- a region in the U.S. state of Massachusetts -- that has its own currency called Berkshares. On this week's Odd Lots podcast, we speak with Alice Maggio, the executive director of the currency, about how a regional currency works, what it accomplishes, and what they’ve learned from it.

Spare a BerkShare?

By  Massachusetts’ Berkshires mountain region enjoys spectacular views, glorious fall foliage, a notable farm-to-table food movement, and one more thing that similar regions don’t have: its own currency.

BerkShares, the local currency, was introduced in 2006 by the Berkshires-based Schumacher Center for a New Economics as a project in sustainable economics. Consumers and businesses can go to 16 branches of four community banks in the region to purchase or redeem BerkShares, a paper currency featuring local scenery and portraits of famous area figures.

Young People Start to Work on Their Own Businesses

Planning on business: The business planning program for young people, which is presented by BerkShares in partnership with the Massachusetts Small Business Development Center Network's Berkshire Regional Office and in collaboration with Berkshire Community College's South County Center, has involved community members as mentors, teachers, and advisors for young entrepreneurs over the past two years. On Jan. 25, this year's program started off with a whole new level of community involvement.
 

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